Posts From February, 2017

Cardiovascular World Gearing Up for ACC.17 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cardiovascular professionals from around the world will be in Washington, D.C., this month for the American College of Cardiology's Scientific Session and Expo -- and LUMEDX will be there as well.

Set for March 17-19, the event will feature interactive debates, education and scientific presentations. ACC.17 also offers 11 learning pathways, allowing participants to focus on their choice of topics. More than 300 sessions will offer dual CME/MOC credit.

A myriad of clinical topics will be discussed, among them:

  • Atrial fibrillation
  • Acute heart failure
  • Cardiac surgery
  • Invasive cardiovascular angiography and intervention
  • Nuclear imaging
  • Pediatric/congenital cardiology
  • Vascular medicine

If you're going to ACC, stop by and say hi at LUMEDX Booth 2411: We'll be presenting the latest CV data-management tools and our new Cardiovascular Performance Program, which offers a no-charge analysis of your facility's CV service line performance on complication rates, including the associated costs -- and opportunities for improvement.  

If you'd like to schedule a one-on-one meeting with LUMEDX, click here

For ACC.17 registration information, click here

We hope to see you in D.C.!

Cardiac Bundled-Payment Program to Go Forward Despite Change in Administration 

The bundled-payment program for cardiac care will go forward despite the Trump administration and the confirmation of new Health & Human Services Secretary Tom  Price, a critic of the program. July 1 remains the start date for the initiative, according to an HHS official who spoke to Modern Healthcare.

Under the bundled-payment model, hospitals in 98 designated markets can keep the savings they achieve if they spend less than the target price for a 90-day episode of care for bypass and heart attack patients. However, hospitals that exceed the target price must repay Medicare -- and Target prices will be determined retrospectively.

The HHS spokesman confirmed that the start of the initiative will not be slowed by the Trump administration, which previously had moved to delay the effective date for a rule that launched it. Nor does it appear that Price will stand in the way of its implementation.

Last fall, Price criticized bundled payments in a letter to then-President Obama. Price objected to the mandatory nature of the initiative, arguing that the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid had exceeded its authority and upset the balance of power between Congress and the president.

CMS predicts that the program--which also covers knee and hip replacement--will save the federal government as much as $159 million between now and 2021. In 2014, the CMS said, heart attack treatment for 200,000 patients cost Medicare more than $6 billion. 

From one hospital to another, the cost of treating heart attack patients varies by as much as 50 percent. Does your hospital have a plan to meet the target prices for bypass and heart attack patients? LUMEDX's Cardiovascular Performance Program can help. Click here to find out how. 

The Promise of Predictive Analysis 

If hospitals could accurately predict which patients were going to experience complications down the road, they could intervene early with those patients, and perhaps prevent them from having to be rehospitalized. Reducing readmissions is one of the potential benefits of predictive analysis, and it’s a big one.

“We have 750 patients every day. Instead of looking at everybody, if we can look at 20 patients, that would be a great advantage,” said Jose Azar, M.D., of Indiana University Health, in an H&HN article.

Also highlighted in the Hospitals & Health Networks article is Christiana Care Health System, which has been using predictive analytics for about five years. The Wilmington, Delaware, nonprofit health system set up its homegrown analytics system in 2012 with $10 million in grant funding from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation Center.

Predictive analytics has helped Christiana Care improve on financial and utilization metrics, but administrators cautioned that predictions are no help if an organization doesn’t have the resources to respond to them. That means everyone – from doctors and care managers to nurses and social workers, and even clerical staff – needs to be ready to intervene based on predictions about patients.

“You need to be able to respond to and receive information in real time,” said Terri Steinberg, M.D., chief health information officer at Christiana Care. “That’s the cost of entry,” Steinberg told H&HN. “Without a robust care-management program, there’s no point” in making predictions.

Complimentary webinar recording available

A recent LUMEDX/Christiana Care webinar is now available as an online download or on CD. "Delivering Clinical and Business Excellence — The Power of Data Transparency: How Christiana Care Leverages Cardiology Data to Improve Care Quality and Contain Costs" can be downloaded by clicking hereIf you prefer to have a CD mailed to you, please click here.

 

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