Posts in Category: electronic health records

LUMEDX Blog 

Physicians must have access to data anytime, anyplace

Electronic health records could improve healthcare for millions, but heightened functionality is needed to better support clinicians and patients, according to a report from the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association.

“The adoption and use of electronic health records could greatly improve health care and lead to better patient outcomes, yet many clinicians are dissatisfied with current EHR systems,” says Alex Krist, M.D., the study’s lead author and associate professor of family medicine and population health in the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine. “Enhancements to electronic record functionality are needed to better support care.”

According to an article from VCU about the AMIA report, EHRs must go beyond documentation and start interpreting and tracking information over time. Other needed improvements cited in the article include better integration of care across settings and the advancement of information exchange to coordinate care across clinicians and settings.

Posted by Jana Ballinger Tuesday, August 01, 2017 2:57:00 PM Categories: EHR electronic health records Lumedx

LUMEDX, DASpecialists team up to improve cardiovascular data management 

​U.S. hospitals highly value enhanced cardiovascular registries data collection as they look for ways to improve patient care, workflow and reporting requirements. To that end, LUMEDX and DASpecialists have announced a partnership to create solutions for cardiovascular data management for hospitals.

The move brings together DASpecialists' expertise and experienced clinical nurse analysts for both the ACC NCDR® and STS data registries with LUMEDX's unique suite of cardiology data analytics, integration and registry tools.

"LUMEDX's cardiovascular registry and clinical workflow solutions help hospitals meet reporting requirements while improving efficiency and supporting quality of care. DASpecialists' services are a perfect complement to LUMEDX's offerings," said Gwendelyn Korney, VP of Corporate Accounts at LUMEDX. "In fact, DASpecialists are providing data abstraction services for several of our customers currently, and these hospitals are very pleased. We believe that this new partnership will enable us to deliver even greater value to our customers."

For more information on LUMEDX HealthView solutions, please email us at info@lumedx.com. For more information on DASpecialists, please visit www.daspecialists.com or email support@daspecialists.com.

Posted by Wednesday, May 10, 2017 12:50:00 PM Categories: best practices cardiology EHR electronic health records HealthView HIT hospitals

Registries play a role in MIPS reporting  

​MIPS, the Medicare physician reimbursement program set to begin in 2019, is causing healthcare providers to consider the use of registries, if they haven't already, as part of their workflow practices.

This Merit-Based Incentive Payment System, part of the Quality Payment Program (QPP) created under the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA), directs clinicians to meaningfully use certified electronic health record (EHR) technology, according to the American College of Cardiology.

One effect of the regulations is the promotion of the use of registries to help clinicians manage the reporting of the EHRs. MIPS allocates five bonus points in its scoring mechanism to clinicians who are using registries. "An eligible clinician can earn bonus points by completing additional measures under the Public Health and Clinical Data Registry Reporting objective, such as reporting to a specialized registry (i.e., the PINNACLE Registry) or using certified EHR technology to complete certain activities in the Improvement Activities category, such as managing referrals and consultations," the American College of Cardiology reports.

It makes good sense to incentivize use of registries, says Raymond R. Russell, III, MD., Ph.D., because they can help physicians and their teams face a challenge to develop systems that help fulfill reporting requirements with minimal burden. "For many cardiologists, an effective, efficient approach to reporting quality measures data is to take advantage of the registries at our disposal," he writes in Cardiovascular Business.

Qualified Clinical Data Registries (QCDRs), allow clinicians to report on specialty-developed measures that are robust and uniquely geared to their area of practice, thus fulfilling CMS reporting requirements while closely tracking the quality of their practices.

"As the cardiovascular community moves forward with the new value-based models for performance evaluation and reimbursement, it will be essential to develop effective tools that support efficient completion of requirements," Russell suggests. "Some tools, such as registries, are proven and available to us now."

LUMEDX, as the leading independent provider of ACC and STS registry software, believes registries are the cornerstone ao cardiovascular data intelligence and the foundation of a true CVIS (Cardiovascular Information Systems). For more information, visit our Registries page: http://www.lumedx.com/registries.aspx.

LUMEDX webinar outlines the benefits of clinical data integration  

Orlando HealthHospital leaders can gain many advantages from aggregating financial, clinical and operational data to create dashboards that help them run their CV service line more effectively.

The LUMEDX webinar, "Improving Performance with Clinical Data Integration: How Orlando Health Used Dashboards to Better Manage its CV Service Line," will outline how to achieve these outcomes.

The complimentary webinar will take place Thursday, May 4, at 10 a.m. PT, 12 p.m. CT and 1 p.m. ET.

In this webinar, Rick Jones, RPH, Business Support Manager, Cardiovascular Service, Surgery and Pharmacy, Orlando Health, will outline how this comprehensive private, not-for-profit healthcare network in Florida is integrating data and making it available to decision-makers on a regular, refreshable basis to improve productivity, clinical and financial outcomes.

Click to Register

Healthcare providers tackle data security issues 

The proliferation of cyberattacks on healthcare providers is well known, with new reports continuing to highlight the problem.

More than 216 hospitals were included in 1,798 breaches between Oct. 21, 2009 and Dec. 31, 2016, according to a report last week in The Journal of the American Medical Association. Additionally, 33 hospitals, or 15 percent, reported more than one breach. Of the 141 affected acute care hospitals, 52 were major academic medical centers.

Also, about 20,000 patients were affected in 24 of the 216 breached hospitals, and six hospitals had over 60,000 breached patient records.

Another recent report found that ransomware attacks more than quadrupled in 2016, with nearly half happening in the healthcare sector. These types of attacks are projected to double again in 2017, Beazley Breach Insights reported.

Some efforts are underway to form a coordinated response to this problem.

At a hearing last week to address cyberattacks in the healthcare industry, the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations, Terry Rice, VP of IT risk management and CISO at Merck, indicated cybersecurity has become a top concern for healthcare organizations.

While hundreds of millions of health records have been compromised in data breaches in recent years, the extent of the problem may be inadequately reported. “Unfortunately, I believe these incidents underrepresent the risks we are facing as an industry,” Rice said.

To fight cyberattacks, Congress should provide organizations tax breaks for Information Sharing and Analysis Centers, educate the industry on the importance of information sharing, protect data shared through ISACs and advocate for public-private partnerships, Denise Anderson, president of the National Health Information Sharing and Analysis Center told the lawmakers.

“It’s become increasingly apparent that the industry needs a government representative who understands cybersecurity issues, threats, vulnerabilities and impacts, as well as the blended threats between physical and cybersecurity,” said Anderson.

At LUMDEX, privacy, security and of course HIPAA-compliance are the essence of our software solutions. We invite you to read our Privacy and Security Policy, our Editorial and Advertising Policy, and our Terms and Conditions of Use. Feel free to browse throughout LUMEDX.com, and please read our Mission Statement in the "About Us" section of LUMEDX.com.

Integrated clinical analytics opens new vistas for healthcare providers 

The explosion of available health data is giving organizations the opportunity for the first time to leverage critical data analysis for key services such as financial and clinical decision support management.

This week, a report from Transparency Market Research (TMR) found that the global IT spending on clinical analytics reached $11.6 billion in 2015 and is projected to reach $32.4 billion by 2024.

The high demand of integrated clinical analytics solutions stems from their dynamic nature and ability for users to extract data from clinical documents synched with the system, such as (electronic health records) EHR, using the data to generate key insights, TMR said.

As a result, this spending makes sense when seen as the means to leverage programs offering actionable insight previously unavailable to healthcare leaders, Stefano Bertozzi, dean and professor of health policy and management at the UC Berkeley School of Public Health, said recently in Healthcare IT News.

"But to the extent that we are increasingly able to correct for other factors that create differences, Big Data can reveal what the differences in performance really are," he said. "And, as a result, what are the interventions that are effective for improving the performance."

LUMEDX is leveraging analytics for healthcare leaders to access new insights in key operations. LUMEDX's HealthView Analytics and Cardiovascular Performance Program (CPP) delivers immediate access to the clinical and financial information needed for success in value-based healthcare: registry, outcomes, and risk data; operational data; physician scorecards; and more.

By offering meaningful analytics that enable you to monitor, measure, and improve all aspects of CV services, LUMEDX's data intelligence tools and packages help drive performance while reducing costs.

 
 

3 New Clients Join LUMEDX Family 

Hospitals in Alabama, Massachusetts and Texas begin CVIS implementation

LUMEDX is happy to welcome to our family three new clients: Marshall Medical Centers; Holyoke Medical Center; and Baylor Scott & White Health, the largest not-for-profit healthcare organization in Texas.

The first Baylor Scott & White location to implement the LUMEDX solution is Baylor Jack and Jane Hamilton Heart and Vascular Hospital in Dallas. LUMEDX is providing the hospital with comprehensive cardiovascular data management that:

  • Connects isolated data sources,
  • Integrates with the enterprise electronic health record (EHR), and
  • Eliminates redundant data collection.

Holyoke Medical Center has gone live with our PACS with Echo Workflow software. After all phases of the CVIS deployment are completed, the secure, cloud-delivered software-as-a-service (SaaS) solution will provide the medical center-located in Holyoke, Massachusetts-with comprehensive management of its Echo, Nuclear, ECG, Holter and Stress workflows, and will offer remote access for physicians, allowing them to access data and complete reports from any location.

The deployment for Marshall Medical Centers is taking place at two hospitals: Marshall Medical North in Guntersville, Alabama; and Marshall Medical South in Boaz, Alabama. Both hospitals have implemented Echo Workflow and ECG-Holter software, which will help them improve performance and quality of care while containing costs and minimizing inefficiency.

We look forward to long and productive relationships with our new partners!

 

Latest Healthcare Cyberattack Highlights Need for Prevention 

How would you like to have to tell 34,000 patients that their data had been hacked? That’s the situation that Quest Diagnostics found itself in recently after hackers stole health information including names, birth dates, telephone numbers and lab results.

The clinical laboratory services company is just the latest victim in a long string of cyberattacks targeting protected health information. One in 13 patients stand to have their records stolen because of a healthcare provider breach, according to Accenture, an industry consulting firm. Healthcare organizations that have been the recent target of cybercriminals include:
Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center, which paid a $17,000 ransom in bitcoin to regain control of its computer systems after a hack.
Anthem Inc., the second-largest U.S. health insurer, which had the records of nearly 80 million customers stolen.
MedStar Health, where hackers encrypted data from 10 hospitals, causing widespread confusion and delays in treatment because providers were unable to access records.
What can healthcare providers do to protect against such cyberattacks? We’ve collected a number of articles offering advice.
Tips for protecting hospitals from ransomware as cyberattacks surge
Hospitals Battle Data Breaches With a Cybersecurity SOS
Protecting a vulnerable industry against cyber attacks
5 Ways Providers Can Prevent Patient Data Breaches

What is your organization doing to protect itself from hackers? Share your strategies in our comments section below.

Clinician mobile device use increasing as healthcare organizations struggle to protect data 

The number of clinicians who use smartphones and other mobile devices on the job is rising rapidly, and so is the number of facilities that have created mobile device management strategies to cope. "Organizations with a documented mobility strategy have nearly doubled, and in-house use of pagers has increased slightly during the past two years," according to Health Data Management.

Almost 90 percent of physicians surveyed reported using smartphones, while about half of nurses and other staff members use them. In response, more than 60 percent of hospitals surveyed have a documented mobile device strategy. (The survey, by mobile messaging service vendor Spok, included responses from about 550 hospitals.)
The leading mobile devices used in hospitals are:

  • Smartphones (78 percent)
  • In-house pagers (71 percent)
  • Wi-Fi phones (69 percent)
  • Wide-area pagers (57 percent)
  • Tablets (52 percent)

Security and privacy, of course, are huge concerns for those setting mobile device policy, leading some organizations to forbid clinicians to use personal devices for work-related communication. About 80 percent of surveyed hospitals with such policies cited fear of data breaches as the reason behind their rules. 

Click here to download the survey.
What's the mobile device policy at your organization? Share your thoughts with the LUMEDX community by commenting below. 

Healthcare Cybersecurity Failings Draw the Ire of Accountability Office 

GAO Recommends Corrective Action by Department of Health and Human Services

More than 113 million electronic health records were breached in 2015, a year that saw a total of 56 cybersecurity attacks in healthcare alone. That's a 13-fold increase from 2006 to 2015.
The Government Accountability Office isn't going to let those cybersecurity failures go unremarked upon. The GAO last week came down hard on the Department of Health and Human Services, pointing out a number of weaknesses in efforts by HHS to help health plans and other providers protect data.
"HHS has established an oversight program for compliance with privacy and security regulations, but its actions did not always fully verify that the regulations were implemented," wrote the GAO in a report released Sept. 26. The report also called out HHS for giving technical assistance "that was not pertinent to identified problems" in cybersecurity, and for failing to follow up on cases it investigated. 
In short, the GAO found, loss or misuse of health information is not being adequately addressed by HHS. To help healthcare organizations comply with HIPAA and prevent further data breaches, the Office said, HHS should take the following corrective actions:

  • Update its guidance for protecting electronic health information to address key security elements.
  • Improve technical assistance it provides to covered entities.
  • Follow up on corrective actions.
  • Establish metrics for gauging the effectiveness of its audit program. 

HHS generally concurred with the recommendations and stated it would take actions to implement them.

UPDATE: On Oct. 4, HHS announced that it had awarded funding to help protect the health sector against cyber threats. Learn who received the funding, and how it is intended to help healthcare organizations.

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