Posts in Category: EHR

LUMEDX Blog 

Full-scale adoption of AI still a long way away, new study says

While the use of clinical and business intelligence tools is on the rise in healthcare, the hype surrounding artificial intelligence is unlikely to lead to full-scale adoption for quite some time, according to a new study by the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS).

In the HIMSS 2017 Essentials Brief: Clinical and Business Intelligence, 23.5 percent of respondents said they expect their organizations to begin using AI within two years, 24.7 percent said within the next three to five years and 8.2 percent said six to 10 years. Only 4.7 percent said their organizations were already using AI and just 10.6 percent said they expect their organizations to begin leveraging AI within the next 12 months.

The prevailing belief seems to be that the technology just isn’t ready yet. Some 37 percent of respondents said further AI development is needed, 23.5 percent said the business case for AI was still unproven and 19.8 percent cited infrastructure constraints within their organizations. When questioned about barriers in the industry overall, 50 percent of respondents said they believe the technology is still in development and current opportunities to apply it to healthcare are difficult to understand.

Here are some of the other findings:

  • Clinical and Business Intelligence solution adoption rates for the U.S. healthcare market in 2017 are 48 percent and 62 percent, respectively.
  • Data governance, an important pre-requisite for the success of data analytics, has shown significant improvement in the “highly optimized” and “strong” categories from study respondents who were asked to qualify their efforts in this area.
  • While leveraging clinical analytics to meet Meaningful Use (MU) requirements and reporting remains the primary area of focus (nearly 70 percent of respondents), there has been an increase in the focus on population health year over year from roughly 20 percent in 2016 to 30 percent in 2017.

To learn more about the HIMSS findings, download the study here.

Clinical and financial business intelligence solutions have become essential to healthcare organizations in the move from volume to value-based care and in the development of new models of care. LUMEDX offers comprehensive, integrated cardiovascular data intelligence and imaging solutions—all with seamless connectivity to your enterprise systems (EHR/HIS).

For more information, download the Cardiovascular Performance Program Info Pack.

Posted by Jana Ballinger Monday, November 13, 2017 10:23:00 AM Categories: analytics data EHR HIMSS value-based purchasing

LUMEDX Blog 

Physicians must have access to data anytime, anyplace

Electronic health records could improve healthcare for millions, but heightened functionality is needed to better support clinicians and patients, according to a report from the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association.

“The adoption and use of electronic health records could greatly improve health care and lead to better patient outcomes, yet many clinicians are dissatisfied with current EHR systems,” says Alex Krist, M.D., the study’s lead author and associate professor of family medicine and population health in the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine. “Enhancements to electronic record functionality are needed to better support care.”

According to an article from VCU about the AMIA report, EHRs must go beyond documentation and start interpreting and tracking information over time. Other needed improvements cited in the article include better integration of care across settings and the advancement of information exchange to coordinate care across clinicians and settings.

Posted by Jana Ballinger Tuesday, August 01, 2017 2:57:00 PM Categories: EHR electronic health records Lumedx

LUMEDX, DASpecialists team up to improve cardiovascular data management 

​U.S. hospitals highly value enhanced cardiovascular registries data collection as they look for ways to improve patient care, workflow and reporting requirements. To that end, LUMEDX and DASpecialists have announced a partnership to create solutions for cardiovascular data management for hospitals.

The move brings together DASpecialists' expertise and experienced clinical nurse analysts for both the ACC NCDR® and STS data registries with LUMEDX's unique suite of cardiology data analytics, integration and registry tools.

"LUMEDX's cardiovascular registry and clinical workflow solutions help hospitals meet reporting requirements while improving efficiency and supporting quality of care. DASpecialists' services are a perfect complement to LUMEDX's offerings," said Gwendelyn Korney, VP of Corporate Accounts at LUMEDX. "In fact, DASpecialists are providing data abstraction services for several of our customers currently, and these hospitals are very pleased. We believe that this new partnership will enable us to deliver even greater value to our customers."

For more information on LUMEDX HealthView solutions, please email us at info@lumedx.com. For more information on DASpecialists, please visit www.daspecialists.com or email support@daspecialists.com.

Posted by Wednesday, May 10, 2017 12:50:00 PM Categories: best practices cardiology EHR electronic health records HealthView HIT hospitals

Registries play a role in MIPS reporting  

​MIPS, the Medicare physician reimbursement program set to begin in 2019, is causing healthcare providers to consider the use of registries, if they haven't already, as part of their workflow practices.

This Merit-Based Incentive Payment System, part of the Quality Payment Program (QPP) created under the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA), directs clinicians to meaningfully use certified electronic health record (EHR) technology, according to the American College of Cardiology.

One effect of the regulations is the promotion of the use of registries to help clinicians manage the reporting of the EHRs. MIPS allocates five bonus points in its scoring mechanism to clinicians who are using registries. "An eligible clinician can earn bonus points by completing additional measures under the Public Health and Clinical Data Registry Reporting objective, such as reporting to a specialized registry (i.e., the PINNACLE Registry) or using certified EHR technology to complete certain activities in the Improvement Activities category, such as managing referrals and consultations," the American College of Cardiology reports.

It makes good sense to incentivize use of registries, says Raymond R. Russell, III, MD., Ph.D., because they can help physicians and their teams face a challenge to develop systems that help fulfill reporting requirements with minimal burden. "For many cardiologists, an effective, efficient approach to reporting quality measures data is to take advantage of the registries at our disposal," he writes in Cardiovascular Business.

Qualified Clinical Data Registries (QCDRs), allow clinicians to report on specialty-developed measures that are robust and uniquely geared to their area of practice, thus fulfilling CMS reporting requirements while closely tracking the quality of their practices.

"As the cardiovascular community moves forward with the new value-based models for performance evaluation and reimbursement, it will be essential to develop effective tools that support efficient completion of requirements," Russell suggests. "Some tools, such as registries, are proven and available to us now."

LUMEDX, as the leading independent provider of ACC and STS registry software, believes registries are the cornerstone ao cardiovascular data intelligence and the foundation of a true CVIS (Cardiovascular Information Systems). For more information, visit our Registries page: http://www.lumedx.com/registries.aspx.

For healthcare services, the cloud has arrived 

It's becoming increasingly clear that healthcare providers are reaping big dividends from hosting data and services in the cloud.

"Hosting applications in the cloud can help you scale as you grow, collaborate with partners and patients, store and manage huge amounts of patient data and get a bigger return on your IT investments in the long run," Molly True wrote last week in HealthCare Business & Technology

She cited the ability for hospitals to combine a public cloud offering with a private cloud offering where the systems are connected and interoperate with other existing systems. Providers can also keep some of their most sensitive data on their premises and some of their applications.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is following this trend. Last week, it announced plans to increase the adoption rate of cloud services this year from 18.5 percent to 30 percent of its systems.

"We have worked to embrace cloud," HHS Chief Information Officer Beth Killoran said. "If you do cloud properly, the implementation should be transparent to the workforce. When we did our financial systems upgrade last year, we had to provide training on the new capabilities -- not the platform. The effort has been a great success."

Moreover, in a recent survey, prominent healthcare executives predict a drastic shift from on-premise IT infrastructure into the cloud. That includes electronic health records, clinical decision support and analytics.

"I predict that five years from now none of us will have datacenters," Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center CIO John Halamka said, according to Healthcare IT News. "We're going to go out to the cloud to find EHRs, clinical decision support, analytics."

LUMEDX's HealthView delivers HIPAA-compliant data management and analytics solutions via the cloud, making important data available to your providers-anywhere, anytime-while reducing the time and money you spend on IT infrastructure. To learn more about our various cloud and on-premise options, contact us at info@lumedx.com.

Integrated clinical analytics opens new vistas for healthcare providers 

The explosion of available health data is giving organizations the opportunity for the first time to leverage critical data analysis for key services such as financial and clinical decision support management.

This week, a report from Transparency Market Research (TMR) found that the global IT spending on clinical analytics reached $11.6 billion in 2015 and is projected to reach $32.4 billion by 2024.

The high demand of integrated clinical analytics solutions stems from their dynamic nature and ability for users to extract data from clinical documents synched with the system, such as (electronic health records) EHR, using the data to generate key insights, TMR said.

As a result, this spending makes sense when seen as the means to leverage programs offering actionable insight previously unavailable to healthcare leaders, Stefano Bertozzi, dean and professor of health policy and management at the UC Berkeley School of Public Health, said recently in Healthcare IT News.

"But to the extent that we are increasingly able to correct for other factors that create differences, Big Data can reveal what the differences in performance really are," he said. "And, as a result, what are the interventions that are effective for improving the performance."

LUMEDX is leveraging analytics for healthcare leaders to access new insights in key operations. LUMEDX's HealthView Analytics and Cardiovascular Performance Program (CPP) delivers immediate access to the clinical and financial information needed for success in value-based healthcare: registry, outcomes, and risk data; operational data; physician scorecards; and more.

By offering meaningful analytics that enable you to monitor, measure, and improve all aspects of CV services, LUMEDX's data intelligence tools and packages help drive performance while reducing costs.

 
 

How the CVIS Strengthens the EHR  

Electronic Health Records are essential tools for healthcare organizations. But they don't obviate the need for a Cardiovascular Information System (CVIS). In fact, changing payment models, new government mandates, and evolving care practices are making the CVIS more important than ever.

Both the clinical and operational aspects of cardiovascular services are highly complex, and they require a technology solution that can match the complexity of the services themselves. A comprehensive CVIS is specifically designed to collect and manage the vast amount of data required by cardiovascular services, and works in tandem with the EHR by:

  • Capturing queryable data to enable analytics and support outcomes improvements
  • Facilitating structured reports
  • Providing the level of detailed information needed to care for heart patients

Learn why cardiovascular services require dedicated information systems in our white paper, "Bridging the Gaps: A True CVIS and the EHR." This document outlines how the CVIS complements the EHR so cardiovascular services can improve efficiency, reduce costs and deliver best-quality patient care. The paper is the result of communications and observations with current LUMEDX clients, as well as with prospective clients who have completed a deep-dive comparison of our CVIS with their EHR systems.

Download your copy today.

3 New Clients Join LUMEDX Family 

Hospitals in Alabama, Massachusetts and Texas begin CVIS implementation

LUMEDX is happy to welcome to our family three new clients: Marshall Medical Centers; Holyoke Medical Center; and Baylor Scott & White Health, the largest not-for-profit healthcare organization in Texas.

The first Baylor Scott & White location to implement the LUMEDX solution is Baylor Jack and Jane Hamilton Heart and Vascular Hospital in Dallas. LUMEDX is providing the hospital with comprehensive cardiovascular data management that:

  • Connects isolated data sources,
  • Integrates with the enterprise electronic health record (EHR), and
  • Eliminates redundant data collection.

Holyoke Medical Center has gone live with our PACS with Echo Workflow software. After all phases of the CVIS deployment are completed, the secure, cloud-delivered software-as-a-service (SaaS) solution will provide the medical center-located in Holyoke, Massachusetts-with comprehensive management of its Echo, Nuclear, ECG, Holter and Stress workflows, and will offer remote access for physicians, allowing them to access data and complete reports from any location.

The deployment for Marshall Medical Centers is taking place at two hospitals: Marshall Medical North in Guntersville, Alabama; and Marshall Medical South in Boaz, Alabama. Both hospitals have implemented Echo Workflow and ECG-Holter software, which will help them improve performance and quality of care while containing costs and minimizing inefficiency.

We look forward to long and productive relationships with our new partners!

 

Spotlight on Analytics, Part 6 

Q & A with Gus Gilbertson, LUMEDX Products Manager

 

The Role of Mobile & The Cloud

Q: What is the role of mobile and the cloud in the healthcare analytics industry?

A: Cloud-based technologies hold the promise of delivering better technology solutions at reduced cost. Mobile will increasingly be the platform of choice for quick updates of the most relevant information for a specific situation. Mobile platforms provide an efficient and effective way to consume healthcare analytics.

Q: What challenges and benefits do you predict will arise as mobile and cloud-based access becomes more prevalent?

A: Security protocols will have to meet standards and may limit access to specific patient data. Analytics not at the patient level will become easy to access. Increasingly, caregivers will know how their organizations are doing at meeting care quality goals efficiently. Eventually, patients may get there too.

Q: What use will healthcare organizations have for patient-generated data?

A: Over time, biometric data collection devices will become connected, cheap enough, and prevalent enough that we will all know our health metrics much better than we do today. As standards arise, healthcare organizations will have to engage with patients to better understand what stories biometrics have to tell, and patients will want to share with their providers to gain better insights into their own health. If providers are not able to deliver insights from biometric data, someone else will.

Enhancing the EHR 

Why Department-Level Systems Remain Critical to Quality 

The need for Electronic Health Records (EHRs) has become widely accepted, and methods to accelerate hospital adoption are proving to be successful, albeit resource-and cost-intensive. While EHRs are highly useful tools for collecting certain kinds of information and making that information available widely across services, cardiovascular care is complex; the data generated by this care is equally complex; and therefore cardiovascular service lines require systems that can match this complexity.


 

Chris Winquist, LUMEDX President and COO, explains how the CVIS augments the EHR to provide CV services with the deep data needed for clinical and business excellence.

Publicly Reported Measures & the Need for Deep Data

Even with the rapid pace of innovations in treatments and technologies, cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States.(1) Unsurprisingly, today a large percentage of publicly reported quality measures are CV measures. Further, new value-based payment models are making up-to-date tracking and managing of performance ever more critical. Demonstrating quality of care delivered has never been more central to cardiac and vascular departments. 

How can a hospital best report, monitor internally and improve quality performance in key measures like Mortality, Complications, and Appropriate Use? With discrete, queryable data. This data must be:

  • Acquired at the point of care so workflow is efficient and data is of high quality 
  • Made accessible to providers across the care continuum so they can make fully informed treatment decisions
  • Reported to the registries
Getting Actionable Information

It's not enough to report to the registries once a quarter and then hope for the best. A high-performing facility must monitor and drill-down into its own data to investigate any problems and take action-as quickly as possible. For this, service lines need systems that can capture information as queryable data elements. And these systems need to integrate with all the devices and clinical systems at work in the service line (ECGs, Stress, Holters, cardiac ultrasounds, hemodynamic systems--to name just a few). 

A dedicated departmental system-one that integrates with clinical-modality systems and the EHR, and offers automated registry data collection and submission to the full suite of cardiac and vascular registries-is the only way for complex environments like cardiac and vascular services to get the data they need to measure and improve performance (clinical, operational) in a substantive way.   

LUMEDX HealthView CVIS Enhances the EHR and Supports Operational Efficiency

With more than 30,000 discrete, queryable data points, HealthView CVIS offers the depth cardiac and vascular departments need for optimal clinical and business excellence. We've developed a powerful data engine that brings insight to every aspect of CV suite operations by drilling into details and reporting on both trending and outlier situations. 

The HealthView CVIS also accepts and transmits relevant data from and to the EHR, so that the enterprise and the service line can operate at the highest levels of efficiency, facilitating best-quality care, improved performance and cost savings.

(1) Go AS, Mozaffarian D, Roger VL, et al. Heart disease and stroke statistics-2014 update: a report from the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2014;129(3):e28-e292.

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