Posts in Category: mobile devices

Latest Healthcare Cyberattack Highlights Need for Prevention 

How would you like to have to tell 34,000 patients that their data had been hacked? That’s the situation that Quest Diagnostics found itself in recently after hackers stole health information including names, birth dates, telephone numbers and lab results.

The clinical laboratory services company is just the latest victim in a long string of cyberattacks targeting protected health information. One in 13 patients stand to have their records stolen because of a healthcare provider breach, according to Accenture, an industry consulting firm. Healthcare organizations that have been the recent target of cybercriminals include:
Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center, which paid a $17,000 ransom in bitcoin to regain control of its computer systems after a hack.
Anthem Inc., the second-largest U.S. health insurer, which had the records of nearly 80 million customers stolen.
MedStar Health, where hackers encrypted data from 10 hospitals, causing widespread confusion and delays in treatment because providers were unable to access records.
What can healthcare providers do to protect against such cyberattacks? We’ve collected a number of articles offering advice.
Tips for protecting hospitals from ransomware as cyberattacks surge
Hospitals Battle Data Breaches With a Cybersecurity SOS
Protecting a vulnerable industry against cyber attacks
5 Ways Providers Can Prevent Patient Data Breaches

What is your organization doing to protect itself from hackers? Share your strategies in our comments section below.

Clinician mobile device use increasing as healthcare organizations struggle to protect data 

The number of clinicians who use smartphones and other mobile devices on the job is rising rapidly, and so is the number of facilities that have created mobile device management strategies to cope. "Organizations with a documented mobility strategy have nearly doubled, and in-house use of pagers has increased slightly during the past two years," according to Health Data Management.

Almost 90 percent of physicians surveyed reported using smartphones, while about half of nurses and other staff members use them. In response, more than 60 percent of hospitals surveyed have a documented mobile device strategy. (The survey, by mobile messaging service vendor Spok, included responses from about 550 hospitals.)
The leading mobile devices used in hospitals are:

  • Smartphones (78 percent)
  • In-house pagers (71 percent)
  • Wi-Fi phones (69 percent)
  • Wide-area pagers (57 percent)
  • Tablets (52 percent)

Security and privacy, of course, are huge concerns for those setting mobile device policy, leading some organizations to forbid clinicians to use personal devices for work-related communication. About 80 percent of surveyed hospitals with such policies cited fear of data breaches as the reason behind their rules. 

Click here to download the survey.
What's the mobile device policy at your organization? Share your thoughts with the LUMEDX community by commenting below. 

Heart Attack Patients Get Faster Care When Medical Teams Use Smartphone Social Network System 

18-month study tracked 114 STEMI patients

New research shows that patients in need of a hospital transfer were treated 27 minutes faster when their medical teams used a smartphone app-based social network system (SNS) to set up the transfer, compared to medical teams who didn’t use the smartphone technology.

The research, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, monitored the time that patients with ST-elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI) suffered from ischemia (reduction in blood supply) while they waited to have a procedure opening their blocked arteries. On nights and weekends, the treatment time reduction was even greater than during the regular work week.

One of the study’s senior researchers, Jin Joo Park, M.D., pointed out that there is a higher risk of death for patients who get to a hospital during off hours—a worldwide trend.

“Transferred STEMI patients rarely achieve timely reperfusion due to delays in the transfer process, especially when transferred during off-hours,” Park told Dicardiology.com. “The use of a smartphone SNS (Social Network System) can help to achieve timely reperfusion for transferred STEMI patients with rapid, seamless communication among healthcare providers.”

Over a period of 18 months, the study enrolled 114 STEMI patients who were transferred to Seoul National University Bundang Hospital. The transfers for 50 of the patients were completed using the SNS app, while the remaining patient transfers used a non-smartphone-based STEMI hotline. The transit times for both groups of patients were similar.

Click here to read the research letter.

 

Spotlight on Analytics, Part 6 

Q & A with Gus Gilbertson, LUMEDX Products Manager

 

The Role of Mobile & The Cloud

Q: What is the role of mobile and the cloud in the healthcare analytics industry?

A: Cloud-based technologies hold the promise of delivering better technology solutions at reduced cost. Mobile will increasingly be the platform of choice for quick updates of the most relevant information for a specific situation. Mobile platforms provide an efficient and effective way to consume healthcare analytics.

Q: What challenges and benefits do you predict will arise as mobile and cloud-based access becomes more prevalent?

A: Security protocols will have to meet standards and may limit access to specific patient data. Analytics not at the patient level will become easy to access. Increasingly, caregivers will know how their organizations are doing at meeting care quality goals efficiently. Eventually, patients may get there too.

Q: What use will healthcare organizations have for patient-generated data?

A: Over time, biometric data collection devices will become connected, cheap enough, and prevalent enough that we will all know our health metrics much better than we do today. As standards arise, healthcare organizations will have to engage with patients to better understand what stories biometrics have to tell, and patients will want to share with their providers to gain better insights into their own health. If providers are not able to deliver insights from biometric data, someone else will.

Top health IT and healthcare stories: Week of 1/18/16 

Cybersecurity, population health, reducing readmissions, and more

Leave the researching to us! LUMEDX surveys the top healthcare and health IT stories of the week.

Mobile health apps particularly vulnerable to hacking

Although most executives believe their applications are secure, eight out of 10 mobile health applications are open to HIPAA violations, hacking, and data theft, according to a new study.

FDA advises medical device manufacturers on cybersecurity

The Food and Drug Administration has issued draft guidelines that outline how medical device manufacturers can prevent cybersecurity threats. In addition to incorporating controls in device designs, makers must also consider ongoing improvements because risks could occur over the devices’ lifecycles.

How to improve population health management

“The sickness, hospital-centric model of healthcare, which has been in place in this country since the mid-1960s, is giving way to an ‘anywhere care’ model that centers on population health management,” according to Executive Insight, which lays out four leadership imperatives to improve population health management.

Reducing readmissions and mortality centers on identifying risk factors

Better coordination between hospitals and post-acute care facilities could decrease the number of patient readmissions to hospitals, and could also reduce mortality rates. A new study by researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine identified specific risk factors that led to hospital readmissions. Almost 50 percent of those readmissions happened within two weeks of patients’ being released from hospitals.

Population health management for older patients

Hospitals are making changes in certain departments and service lines with the needs of older patients in mind. From the emergency department to the OR, healthcare organizations are looking at new ways to treat the aging population.


 

Best of Cardio and Healthcare News: Week of 11/23/15  

Did you have a chance to check out the latest news from the cardiology community? We've captured the top industry stories from this week that you won't want to miss.

After Obamacare implementation, public still rates healthcare good or excellent

Implementation of the Affordable Care Act (AKA Obamacare) hasn’t changed how Americans rate their healthcare, according to a new Gallup poll. More than half of the respondents rated their healthcare good or excellent, but less than 24 percent were satisfied with healthcare costs. Healthcare coverage was rated positively by only 33 percent.

Diagnostic ECG waveform reading in Carestream Vue Motion viewer cleared by FDA

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has given clearance for diagnostic reading of electrocardiogram (ECG) waveforms on mobile tablets and desktop displays using Carestream’s Vue Motion universal viewer. The new capability would allow physicians to give faster responses to ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and other serious heart conditions. It would also allow physicians to simultaneously view current and prior ECGs using tools that include pan, zoom, line measurement, caliper, and gain and speed adjustments.

Cardiac outcomes improved after using intravascular ultrasound in stent implantation

After one year, patients with long coronary lesions who were implanted with an intravascular ultrasound-guided everolimus-eluting stent had a significantly lower rate of major adverse cardiac events compared with those implanted with an angiography-guided stent, according to cardiovascularbusiness.com. “Patients were implanted with an everolimus-eluting stent (Xience prime, Abbott Vascular) for long coronary lesions and randomized to receive intravascular ultrasound-guided or angiographic-guided stent implantation immediately after their pre-PCI angiogram,” the site reports. One year later, 2.9 percent of patients undergoing intravascular ultrasound-guided stent implantation suffered major adverse cardiac events, compared with 5.8 percent of patients in the angiographic-guided group.

Cardio-diagnostic processes improve with smart ECG stethoscope attachment

Rijuven’s CardioSleeve for Pediatrics, the first device that adds electrocardiogram (ECG) capabilities to transform stethoscopes into smart, mobile-connected devices, has been cleared by the FDA. The device, which can be attached to any stethoscope, can analyze for arrhythmia or murmur and identify heart failure. 

Number and severity of migraine headaches reduced by dual antiplatelet therapy following transcatheter ASD closure

The use of dual antiplatelet therapy consisting of clopidogrel and aspirin–as opposed to aspirin alone–led to fewer and less severe migraine headaches for patients undergoing transcatheter atrial septal defect (ASD) closure. That’s according to a randomized, double-blind trial. About 15 percent of patients had new-onset migraine episodes following transcatheter ASD closure, previous studies found. 

Remote monitoring system for patients with implantable pacemakers gets FDA approval

The first app-based remote monitoring system in the U.S. for patients with implantable pacemakers–called MyCareLink Smart Monitor–was approved by the FDA on Nov. 17. The system, manufactured by Medtronic, has a mobile app that is available for free on Android and Apple platforms. It also features a handheld portable device reader.

Best of Health IT News: Week of 05/14/15 

Did you have a chance to check out the latest healthcare IT news stories around the Web? We’ve captured the top industry news stories from this week that you won’t want to miss.

Healthcare Big Data Analytics: From Description to Prescription 

According to Health IT Analytics, many providers still struggle to understand how big their data is, and how to collect and use it effectively. To manage their data, healthcare organizations need to understand the three types of analytics: descriptive, predictive, and prescriptive. 

Four Ways Hospitals are Improving Behavioral Health Care

Hospitals & Health Networks Magazine discusses the different ways in which healthcare organizations are improving behavioral health care. Mental health management relies on behavioral health strategies that improve access to care while taking the burden off of emergency departments. 

Physician Education for ICD-10

​Diagnostic Imaging reports on the implementation of ICD-10, which is scheduled to go into effect in October of this year. Healthcare systems and physicians will need to begin training their staff, using the following training modalities: in-person training, online training, webinar training, and more. 

A Survey on the State of Clinical Decision Support 

A recent survey by LogicNets and HIMSS shows that over 50% of respondents are using or have established plans to acquire a clinical decision support (CDS) capablitiy within the next 24 months. The survey respondents stated that they were using CDS for: reducing errors, improving efficiency, standardization, and cost-savings. 

Thursday, May 14, 2015 2:05:00 PM Categories: analytics EHR health IT HHS HIE HIMSS HIT ICD-10 industry news mobile devices training

Best of Health IT News: Week of 01/30/14 

Did you have a chance to check out the latest healthcare IT news stories around the Web? We’ve captured the top industry news stories from this week that you won’t want to miss. 

ONC to keep tabs on HIE reporting requirement

FierceHealthIT discusses how the office of the National Coordinator for Health Informatino Technology intends to keep tabs on state HIEs by requiring an annual report. 

Health IT moving to critical step 

According to a conference on the state of the healthcare IT industry, the second boom in healthcare IT is happening now. Because the last four years have been spent installing new hardware and software at healthcare facilities, providers will now work on using healthcare data in meaningful, prescriptive ways. 

The hope and challenge of social media for chronic disease care 

Government Health IT reports on how researchers have found that social media empowers users and motivates them to take personal responsibility for health behavior. They also provide a network of support, motivation, and disease management education. 

Report finds volumes of health IT M&A deals declined by 16% 

According to a report published by Berkery Noyes, the overall volume of mergers and acquisitions in the health IT sector declined by 16% annually from 2011 through 2013. 

Thursday, January 30, 2014 3:03:00 PM Categories: EHR health information exchange health IT HIT hospitals industry news mobile devices ONC

Best of Health IT News: Week of 12/12/13 

Did you have a chance to check out the latest healthcare IT news stories around the Web? We’ve captured the top industry news stories from this week that you won’t want to miss. 

Government Health IT Report Expected Early 2014 

According to MedPage Today, a strategy report from the FDA, ONC, and the Federal Communications Commission will come out next year with recommendations on promoting innovation in health information technology. 

Stakeholders Continue to Comment on New Meaningful Use Timeline

On Friday, December 8, 2013, CMS revised the meaningful use timeline to extend Stage 2 through 2016, and to have Stage 3 begin in 2017 for health care providers who have completed at least two years of Stage 2. Stakeholders such as the AMA, AHA, and various vendors have weighed in with their opinions on the delay. 

mHealth, Cloud Computing to Dominate Healthcare in 2014

Fierce Mobile Healthcare predicts that mobile health and cloud computing will be the top trends for healthcare in 2014. According to a study by research firm Frost & Sullivan, "...as more healthcare IT and patient monitoring tools are integrated, every hospital facility will eventually have to acquire a fully-enterprise wireless solution." 

Whopping $17B Paid Out So Far for MU 

Healthcare IT News reports that the Medicare and Medicaid EHR incentive programs have paid out $17 billion to eligible hospitals and healthcare providers. The incentive program's goal is to speed adoption of EHRs within healthcare facilities. 

Best of Health IT News: Week of 11/14/13 

Did you have a chance to check out the latest healthcare IT news stories around the Web? We’ve captured the top industry news stories from this week that you won’t want to miss. 

Meaningful Use Payouts Top $16.5 Billion 

FierceEMR reports that over 325,000 unique providers have received incentives of more than $16.5 billion in payouts. Participation in the Meaningful Use incentive program continues to grow. 

Why Integrating EMRs and digital images is an ethical and practical imperative 

Radiologist Dr. Andrew Litt talks about why he believes that improving access to patient information and unifying the patient record across different authorized caregivers will improve patient care. 

Experts Reshape Treatment Guide for Cholesterol

The New York Times covers one of the top healthcare stories of this week, which is that the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology have released updated guidelines on statins use to reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke. 

What's Hindering Healthcare IT Innovation (And How That Can Change) 

CIO discusses four trends that will help shape advances in healthcare, including a focus on data analytics, and mobile health initiatives that will reduce hospital readmissions. 

Thursday, November 14, 2013 2:38:00 PM Categories: industry news mobile devices Washington
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