Posts in Category: clinical process of care

Data accessibility viewed as key to closing the gap between value-based care and health IT 

​Although much progress has been achieved in digitizing the healthcare system, today's health IT infrastructure still struggles to support a transition to "value-based care," according to a new report from the American Medical Informatics Association.

"Provider organizations pursuing new models of health care delivery and payment are finding that their electronic systems lack the capabilities needed to succeed," the study asserted. "The result is a chasm between the current health IT ecosystem and the health IT ecosystem that is desperately needed."

The report, titled, "Crossing the health IT chasm: considerations and policy recommendations to overcome current challenges and enable value-based care," outlines policy recommendations for patients, providers and researchers to improve access to healthcare data for all the groups and proposes new standards for IT systems and applications.

LUMEDX, the leader in cardiovascular data intelligence and a pioneer in cloud-powered healthcare solutions, offers a comprehensive suite of software and services enables meaningful analytics, high-performance workflows, optimal integration of clinical and HIS data, and improved continuity of care.

For more information on LUMEDX HealthView solutions, please visit www.lumedx.com or email info@lumedx.com.​

LUMEDX webinar outlines the benefits of clinical data integration  

Orlando HealthHospital leaders can gain many advantages from aggregating financial, clinical and operational data to create dashboards that help them run their CV service line more effectively.

The LUMEDX webinar, "Improving Performance with Clinical Data Integration: How Orlando Health Used Dashboards to Better Manage its CV Service Line," will outline how to achieve these outcomes.

The complimentary webinar will take place Thursday, May 4, at 10 a.m. PT, 12 p.m. CT and 1 p.m. ET.

In this webinar, Rick Jones, RPH, Business Support Manager, Cardiovascular Service, Surgery and Pharmacy, Orlando Health, will outline how this comprehensive private, not-for-profit healthcare network in Florida is integrating data and making it available to decision-makers on a regular, refreshable basis to improve productivity, clinical and financial outcomes.

Click to Register

For healthcare services, the cloud has arrived 

It's becoming increasingly clear that healthcare providers are reaping big dividends from hosting data and services in the cloud.

"Hosting applications in the cloud can help you scale as you grow, collaborate with partners and patients, store and manage huge amounts of patient data and get a bigger return on your IT investments in the long run," Molly True wrote last week in HealthCare Business & Technology

She cited the ability for hospitals to combine a public cloud offering with a private cloud offering where the systems are connected and interoperate with other existing systems. Providers can also keep some of their most sensitive data on their premises and some of their applications.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is following this trend. Last week, it announced plans to increase the adoption rate of cloud services this year from 18.5 percent to 30 percent of its systems.

"We have worked to embrace cloud," HHS Chief Information Officer Beth Killoran said. "If you do cloud properly, the implementation should be transparent to the workforce. When we did our financial systems upgrade last year, we had to provide training on the new capabilities -- not the platform. The effort has been a great success."

Moreover, in a recent survey, prominent healthcare executives predict a drastic shift from on-premise IT infrastructure into the cloud. That includes electronic health records, clinical decision support and analytics.

"I predict that five years from now none of us will have datacenters," Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center CIO John Halamka said, according to Healthcare IT News. "We're going to go out to the cloud to find EHRs, clinical decision support, analytics."

LUMEDX's HealthView delivers HIPAA-compliant data management and analytics solutions via the cloud, making important data available to your providers-anywhere, anytime-while reducing the time and money you spend on IT infrastructure. To learn more about our various cloud and on-premise options, contact us at info@lumedx.com.

How the CVIS Strengthens the EHR  

Electronic Health Records are essential tools for healthcare organizations. But they don't obviate the need for a Cardiovascular Information System (CVIS). In fact, changing payment models, new government mandates, and evolving care practices are making the CVIS more important than ever.

Both the clinical and operational aspects of cardiovascular services are highly complex, and they require a technology solution that can match the complexity of the services themselves. A comprehensive CVIS is specifically designed to collect and manage the vast amount of data required by cardiovascular services, and works in tandem with the EHR by:

  • Capturing queryable data to enable analytics and support outcomes improvements
  • Facilitating structured reports
  • Providing the level of detailed information needed to care for heart patients

Learn why cardiovascular services require dedicated information systems in our white paper, "Bridging the Gaps: A True CVIS and the EHR." This document outlines how the CVIS complements the EHR so cardiovascular services can improve efficiency, reduce costs and deliver best-quality patient care. The paper is the result of communications and observations with current LUMEDX clients, as well as with prospective clients who have completed a deep-dive comparison of our CVIS with their EHR systems.

Download your copy today.

Radial Access, Same-Day Release after PCIs Could Save $300 Million a Year 

New research shows that U.S. hospitals could save $300 million annually--and see fewer complications--if they use transradial access for percutaneous coronary interventions, and release patients on the same day.

Analysis shows that same-day, transradial PCIs cost $3,500 less than discharges that did not occur on the day of the procedure. Compared to transfemoral interventions, transradial PCIs also reduce:

  • Bleeding
  • Vascular complications
  • Transfusions

"We now have identified a mechanism for hospitals to improve their efficiency and lower costs that is associated with improved PCI outcomes simultaneously," says the study's lead author, Amit P. Amin, MD, of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, in a news release.

"Our data show there is a tremendous potential to reduce costs of PCI, reduce complications and achieve a 'win-win' for both patients and hospitals," Amin adds. "Hospitals that redesign their care pathways to perform more same-day, transradial PCIs can potentially save hundreds of thousands of dollars each year."

As this research indicates, a major part of achieving cost savings is reducing avoidable complications. But reducing PCI complications is just one part of the puzzle; CV service lines can reduce adverse events for a myriad of other procedures.

There are also opportunities to achieve cost savings in other ways, such as by improving throughput and making billing easier and more accurate. Identifying these opportunities is crucial for physicians and cardiovascular leadership.

That's where LUMEDX's Cardiovascular Performance Program comes in. This new program offers a no-charge analysis of your facility's performance on complication rates and other issues that reduce revenues. It then generates a detailed plan for improvement.

The opportunities for better clinical and financial performance are dramatic. Learn more by contacting the Cardiovascular Performance Program team at info@lumedx.com or 800-966-0699.

See you at ACC: If you'll be at ACC.17 this month, stop by and say hi at LUMEDX Booth 2411. Or schedule a meeting to find out about the latest innovative software and services that can help you improve care and dramatically reduce costs across your CV service line. 

 

Are You Ready for the New Cardiac Bundled-Payment Program? 

Heart hospital across the country are preparing for the new mandatory bundled-payment program for cardiac care. Set to begin this July, the program makes hospitals in certain markets accountable for the quality and cost of care for bypass and heart attack patients until 90 days after discharge.

CMS predicts that the program-which also covers knee and hip replacements-will save the federal government as much as $159 million between now and 2021. In 2014, the CMS said, heart attack treatment for 200,000 patients cost Medicare more than $6 billion. From one hospital to another, the cost of treating heart attack patients varies by as much as 50 percent, according to Modern Healthcare.

The bundled-payment model allows hospitals to keep the savings they achieve if they spend less than a target price for an episode of care. However, hospitals that exceed the target price must repay Medicare. Target prices will be determined retrospectively.

LUMEDX offers a path to meeting or beating those targets. Our Cardiovascular Performance Program helps facilities gather the consolidated CV data they need to see and manage quality and cost of care in real time. The program helps CV service lines analyze their data, identify higher-risk patients and act to ensure they are performing at or better than national targets so they can keep any savings they have realized-and avoid repaying Medicare. 

Inpatient costs are likely to account for most of the cost of the 90-day bundled-payment period, and LUMEDX is uniquely positioned to help providers reduce those expenses. Our Cardiovascular Performance Program can help CV service lines contain costs while improving outcomes by reducing:

  • Door-to-balloon time
  • Door-to-Troponin-testing time
  • PCI and CABG complications
  • PCI and CABG cost-per-case variation

These are just a few of the many ways LUMEDX solutions can help heart hospitals demonstrate best-quality, best-value care delivery-and uncover the solutions to radical improvement. 

How will the bundled-payment program impact your CV service line? Share your thoughts in our comment section, below. 

Heart Attack Patients Get Faster Care When Medical Teams Use Smartphone Social Network System 

18-month study tracked 114 STEMI patients

New research shows that patients in need of a hospital transfer were treated 27 minutes faster when their medical teams used a smartphone app-based social network system (SNS) to set up the transfer, compared to medical teams who didn’t use the smartphone technology.

The research, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, monitored the time that patients with ST-elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI) suffered from ischemia (reduction in blood supply) while they waited to have a procedure opening their blocked arteries. On nights and weekends, the treatment time reduction was even greater than during the regular work week.

One of the study’s senior researchers, Jin Joo Park, M.D., pointed out that there is a higher risk of death for patients who get to a hospital during off hours—a worldwide trend.

“Transferred STEMI patients rarely achieve timely reperfusion due to delays in the transfer process, especially when transferred during off-hours,” Park told Dicardiology.com. “The use of a smartphone SNS (Social Network System) can help to achieve timely reperfusion for transferred STEMI patients with rapid, seamless communication among healthcare providers.”

Over a period of 18 months, the study enrolled 114 STEMI patients who were transferred to Seoul National University Bundang Hospital. The transfers for 50 of the patients were completed using the SNS app, while the remaining patient transfers used a non-smartphone-based STEMI hotline. The transit times for both groups of patients were similar.

Click here to read the research letter.

 

Spotlight on Analytics, Part 5 

Q & A with Gus Gilbertson, Product Manager for LUMEDX

Predictive Analytics

Q: How much of the healthcare industry has adopted predictive analytics?

A: By definition, negotiations between providers and payers are a game of who can better predict patient outcomes. Win-win scenarios can certainly be devised, but a lack of predictive ability puts an organization at risk for poor contract structuring.

Clinical outcomes are increasingly a game of predicting outcomes and identifying the levers that affect those outcomes so providers are able to improve on future outcomes. Operational predictions are also important, as misunderstanding patient care needs can lead to expensive outlier care patterns or care variations that break capacity management efforts and budgets.

Q: How do you see predictive analytics having an impact on healthcare organizations, and specifically on heart hospitals?

A: Outcome prediction and risk profiling will increasingly guide care pathway selection and tailor care patterns to targeted patient profiles. Predicting and applying the care pathway that leads to the best health outcome at the lowest cost is the foundation of healthcare in the value-based purchasing era.

The dynamics of heart health are increasingly being researched and documented, leading to continued technical evolution and improved outcomes. Being able to predict which technology will lead to the best patient outcomes per dollar spent--whether it be a TVR, and VAD, or an aspirin—is a crucial skill for providers.

Q: What is the role of predictive analytics in affecting areas like heart failure readmissions?

A: Estimates continue to suggest that as much as 20 percent or more of care is wasted. Access to predictive models for identifying patients at risk for readmissions--and providing better targeted treatment up front--are the keys to reducing readmission. Those who best understand their care pathways and patient risk profiles will be the ones who can provide the best value in heart failure care. They will be the ones who can best explain the risk factors inherent in their readmission outcomes to stakeholders from patients to community groups and regulators.

Stay tuned for Part 6 of this series!

 

Best of Health IT News: Week of 06/18/15 

Did you have a chance to check out the latest healthcare IT news stories around the Web? We’ve captured the top industry news stories from this week that you won’t want to miss.

An Ideal Transition: Multi-Campus Rollout of Echo CVIS at Orlando Health 

Download the latest case study from Diagnostic & Interventional Cardiology to learn how Orlando Health has successfully implemented a physician structured reporting solution and PACS system for cardiac echo across five of its campuses. 

Interoperability, Telehealth Key to Chronic Disease Management 

Health IT Analytics reports on a recent letter that the College of Healthcare Information Management Executives (CHIME) has written to Congress, stating that the healthcare industry should focus on improving health data interoperability, raising patient engagement, and championing telehealth. 

Healthcare Increasingly Requires a Tech-Savvy Workforce 

According to Fierce Health IT, as the use of technology in healthcare continues to rise, healthcare providers must hire doctors and nurses who are tech-savvy. Hospital executive teams also increasingly include a chief analytics officer, a chief transformation officer, or a chief information security officer. 

ICD-10 Testing Lags Among Providers

According to a survey by the eHealth Initiative, healthcare providers continue to lag behind when it comes to testing in preparation for the transition to ICD-10. Only half of all respondents said that they had conducted test transactions using the new ICD-10 codes, and 19% stated that they had no plans to conduct end-to-end testing. 

Best of Health IT News: Week of 05/28/15 

Did you have a chance to check out the latest healthcare IT news stories around the Web? We’ve captured the top industry news stories from this week that you won’t want to miss.

An Ideal Transition: Multi-Campus Rollout of Echo CVIS at Orlando Health

A new case study from Diagnostic and Interventional Cardiology reveals how Orlando Health has implemented LUMEDX's physician structured reporting and image management solution across five campuses. The new system has allowed Orlando Health to reduce report turnaround time, standardize the workflow, and support quality improvement programs.

What Exactly is "Population Health," Anyway?

Healthcare IT News discusses the definition of population health with a group of industry experts, including hospital CEOs, doctorpreneurs, startup executives, and more. The CEO of St. Joseph Hospital in Nashua, N.H., Richard Boehler, MD calls population health: "... the ability of a provider to effectively manage the healthcare needs of a defined group across the continuum of services either through direct provision of care or through structured relationships with other providers."

Infographic: The Future of Clinical & Business Intelligence in Healthcare

A new infographic from the HIMSS Analytics 2015 Clinical & Business Intelligence Study has found that there has been a 6% increase in the number of healthcare organizations using a C&BI solution since 2013. Additionally, 52% of those polled said that they currently use their EHR/HIS vendor for C&BI. 

Report Includes Bypass, Heart Failure in Hospital Ratings

According to Cardiovascular Business, U.S. News and World Reports now bundles heart bypass and other operations with the conditions congestive heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in a rating called "Best Hospitals for Common Care." The new rating breaks hospitals down into three categories: high, average, and below performers. 

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