Best of Health IT News: Week of 6/7/13 

Did you have a chance to check out the latest healthcare IT news stories around the Web? We’ve captured the top industry news stories from this week that you won’t want to miss.

3 Paths Big Data Will Blaze

With big data on everyone’s mind, Healthcare IT News covers the top three ways that data will improve the patient experience.

Meaningful use incentives ascend past $14.5B

Government Health IT reports on how the federal government has paid out $14.6 billion in EHR incentive payments to date. More than 292,000 Medicare and Medicaid eligible providers have received EHR incentive payments.

Big Data Surge From Federal Agencies Will Drive Health IT

The big story this week is the release of new federal health data by HHS, CMS, and ONC. CIO covers the news and discusses how the federal government is using data transparency as a means to drive private sector innovations in health care.

EHRs could use an infusion of mobile technology

In FierceMobileHealthcare, Editor Greg Slabdokin discusses the increasing adoption of EHRs and what it means for the future of health care. He also highlights a study released on May 30 that found that an overwhelming majority of physicians surveyed say that mobile applications are necessary in order to access data anytime, anywhere.

HHS, CMS, ONC release new health data to promote openness

EHR Intelligence reports on HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius’s announcement that new data will be released from HHS, CMS, and ONC on a variety of health topics.

Friday, June 07, 2013 9:29:00 AM Categories: best practices data security EHR HHS industry news ONC patient experience of care

HHS, CMS, and ONC Release Federal Health Data  

On Friday we talked about how meaningful data can help physicians and other providers improve care and achieve business success. This Monday, HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius announced that HHS, CMS, and ONC have released new federal health data as part of a mission to create a more transparent health care marketplace and to help researchers and consumers make informed decisions.

This release of information highlights the importance of monitoring your facility’s data, improving clinical and financial performance metrics, and ensuring that numbers are accurate. As health care data becomes more public, it is likely that more consumers will turn to metrics when choosing care options and providers. It is therefore critical that health care facilities not only deliver the highest quality care but also maintain accurate data that reflects their success.

Some notable information released includes:

What do you think of the latest release of federal health data? How has your facility used meaningful data to improve health care? 

The Importance of Data in Health Care  

On the White House Blog this week, United States CTO Todd Park speaks of a data-powered revolution in health care. He argues that data-powered tools change the way that clinicians and health care facilities respond to patient need and provide care – for the better. As Park puts it, “[Data-powered IT tools] are helping clinicians and patients get the latest and greatest evidence-based, life-saving best practices at their fingertips. And much more.”

As we move into an increasingly evidence-based health care system, it becomes critical for providers to embrace data for numerous reasons.

Meaningful data allows clinicians and hospital staff to make informed decisions to improve quality of care.

In his post, Park talks about how data-powered IT tools are “enabling clinicians to analyze their patient population, understand who needs help (including and especially patients who haven’t been able to come into their office), and proactively reach out and give those patients the care they need.”

In addition, being able to monitor and analyze clinical data allows facilities to understand where programs are working – and where they need improvement.

Aggregating data from different areas allows facilities to see the bigger picture.

Instead of keeping data separate across various repositories, creating a comprehensive system allows health care providers to see how their organization is doing on a macro level. By seeing the full picture of a facility’s data – financial and clinical – management can see how business practices affect clinical performance.

Quality data means higher facility performance.

Registries, insurance companies, and third-party payers are now, more than ever, closely examining a facility’s numbers. By ensuring that the data they provide is error-free, health care facilities can accurately represent their performance and receive maximum reimbursements.

At LUMEDX, we believe that the data-powered revolution in health care is well underway and look forward to seeing how innovations continue to shape and improve patient care. How do you see data shaping care delivery at your facility?

Best of Health IT News: Week of 5/31/13 

Did you have a chance to check out the latest healthcare IT news stories around the Web? We’ve captured the top industry news stories from this week that you won’t want to miss.

EHR Mandate Riles Massachusetts Doctors

InformationWeek covers the controversy rising in Massachusetts over an amendment to a state law that would require physicians to show EHR proficiency – or lose their medical licenses in 2015.

Feds move nearer to patient-safety framework for health IT

ModernHealthcare.com reports on how the federal government is now closer to adopting a regulatory and patient-safety framework for computerized healthcare devices.

A Data-Powered Revolution in Health Care

Todd Park, United States Chief Technology Officer, weighs in on the White House Blog about the data-powered revolution in health care and how innovative tools are helping “clinicians succeed at delivering better care at lower cost.”

Quebec to make EHR live in all regions

GovernmentHealthIT covers Quebec’s bold move to implement a $1.6 billion electronic health record system across all 17 regions. The project will reach more than 8 million people by the end up 2015.

How to avoid EHR backlash in the patient experience, clinic

EHR Intelligence discusses “EHR backlash” and how to smoothly manage enterprise-wide software implementations.

Friday, May 31, 2013 9:56:00 AM Categories: EHR health information technology HIT industry news President Barack Obama

Prof Montage: Cardiology Lessons for the YouTube Generation 

Australian cardiologist Dr. Jonathan Silberberg has embarked on a mission to provide a free, educational resource for medical students. Instead of using traditional textbooks, Dr. Silberberg created a series of 3-minute videos that explain complex cardiology concepts. Currently, Prof Montage has 20 videos posted on Clinical Cardiology, Cardiac Physiology, and Clinical Epidemiology.

A second series of videos is scheduled to be released in June 2013.

Watch below for an introduction to the Prof Montage cast of characters.

 

Wednesday, May 29, 2013 12:23:00 PM Categories: cardiology

Best of Health IT News: Week of 5/24/13 

Did you have a chance to check out the latest healthcare IT news stories around the Web? We’ve captured the top industry news stories from this week that you won’t want to miss.

Most Healthcare Execs Expect Growth Despite Complaints of Overregulation

HealthTechZone reports on a Forbes Insight study that found 52% of middle market healthcare executives expect growth next year, and that growth will come from healthcare industry trends such as advances in healthcare technology.

CCHIT: Interoperability breakthrough near

FierceHealthIT covers a recent whitepaper published by the Certification Commitment for Health Information Technology (CCHIT) that finds that the healthcare industry is on the verge of a breakthrough in interoperability.

Health IT market in growth mode

Healthcare IT News presents the latest Research and Markets report, projecting that the healthcare IT market will be valued at $56.7 billion by 2017. Some of the reasons that analysts cite for this growth include rising demand for interoperable systems and the high rate of investment from using these systems.

Friday, May 24, 2013 8:35:00 AM Categories: health information technology industry news

My Job at LUMEDX: Kathy Sorensen 

Clinical sales consultant uses frequent flyer miles to travel to Africa

Describe your professional background and what brought you to work at LUMEDX.
I was trained as a radiologic technologist. I worked in hospitals for 10 years, seven of those in the cath lab. I got an opportunity to work for a device company and was ready for a change. I took it, and have been on the vendor side for 23 years now.

Is there an average day for you? 
Every day is a bit different. I travel to hospitals to do demos for cardiology departments looking to purchase a CVIS. Those demos can be a couple of hours to a week. When I am not on the road, I do demos via WebEx (a web conferencing application). I also train new employees, and work with engineering and product development. I have been at LUMEDX for 14 years, so I do a bit of everything.

How have health IT and hospitals changed since you’ve been in the industry?
Healthcare has changed a great deal over the last 25 years. Departments used to be able to purchase what they wanted with limited oversight. Economic changes and government regulations have changed the way products are purchased. The timeline for decision making is much longer.
However, some of these regulations have required cardiology departments to focus much more on improving performance and outcomes. LUMEDX can help our clients with these types of challenges.

What would someone from outside the industry find surprising?
I guess most people don’t think that hospitals are businesses. Although the first goal of all hospitals is to take care of patients, they also have to watch finances and, ultimately, the bottom line. It is getting harder and harder for hospitals to meet these very different goals.

How has LUMEDX changed since you’ve started working here?
We have grown tremendously. I used to know everyone. I don’t anymore.

You get to keep the frequent flyer miles you rack up as part of your job. Have you used those miles to go anywhere interesting?
I used miles to fly to Africa and back. This June, I am using miles to fly business class to Italy. I also got my best friend a business class ticket with miles as well. My safari to Africa was a long-held dream. I took a three-week trip with friends to celebrate our 50th birthdays. We went to Botswana, Zambia and South Africa. So I like traveling for work and of course also for pleasure. 

Monday, April 22, 2013 11:42:00 AM Categories: careers health IT Lumedx

How to Get a Job at LUMEDX (And How Not To) 

We know many visitors to our website are interested in career positions. The following is a  guest post from the blog of consulting firm ProLango featuring LUMEDX Technical Recruiter Josh Jozwik offering tips on what to do and what not to do when applying for a position at LUMEDX.

By Paul Anderson

There are job seekers who research company e-mail addresses and spam them with their resumes with the hopes of getting a job. These techniques won’t help you land an interview with LUMEDX, a medical software company in Bellevue, says Josh Jozwik, a technical recruiter for the company.

Jozwik says job seekers need to avoid the traditional job-hunting techniques if they’re looking to get an interview with his company. Here are other things he says job seekers should avoid:

Cover letters: Most cover letters sent to LUMEDX offer little or no value to Josh or his hiring team. Many cover letters he sees tend to be templates found on traditional resume books. If you’re going to send a cover letter, Josh suggests you send a short paragraph and bullet list on how your accomplishments might meet the company’s objectives. If there are shortcomings on your resume, this is the opportunity to address them. 

Applying for every position listed: There is a misconception that if you send enough resumes to a company, you might get their attention. Applying for every position listed shows that you’re desperate, you lack a sense of career direction, and are just trying to meet your unemployment numbers. Quality is more important than quantity, says Jozwik.

The number of resumes in LUMEDX’s Applicant Tracking System (ATS) has grown by over 60 percent in the last two years alone. Josh and his team are inundated. While the openings are scarce, the techniques shared below can help you land an interview with his company:

LinkedIn introductions: Josh is connected to 90 percent of the staff in Bellevue. If you’re hoping to get an informational meeting with the company, chances are you’ll have to go through him. While you could use job boards or apply on the company website directly, Jozwik is a big advocate of LinkedIn introductions. See if you know someone who can vouch for you and introduce you to the company.

LinkedIn discussions: Jozwik and his team monitor certain LinkedIn groups carefully and reach out to interesting participants. Visit Josh's profile, notice which groups he’s a member of and join them. Review the questions and comments other members are posting on these groups and contribute your expertise. Your involvement can help you shine with LUMEDX and other corporations monitoring these sources.

Employee referral: While it’s impossible for the company to look at every resume submitted for each position, they take their referrals seriously. In fact on their career site, they have a tool called “Are you on LinkedIn: Do you know anyone at LUMEDX?” By clicking on this tool, you can see who you might already know who can introduce you to the company.

If you’re a technology professional with medical experience and you use the techniques mentioned above, your odds have greatly increased in getting an interview with the company.

Reposted with permission from ProLango Consulting.

Thursday, April 18, 2013 4:09:00 PM Categories: careers health IT Lumedx

Photos From the Lumedx User Group Conference in San Francisco 

 

(Top left: Training session for new users presented by Linda Grdina of Bryan Medical Center in Lincoln, Nebraska. Top center: LUMEDX team members Senior Marketing & Events Coordinator Joelle Mitchell and Senior Director–Client Relations/Inside and Vertical Sales Gwen Korney. Top right: Senior Product Education Trainer John Nicholls and Clinical Registries Manager Katrina Craig. Bottom row, left: Linda Grdina and Joelle Mitchell. Bottom row, center: Reception in San Francisco's Hotel Nikko. Bottom row, right: John Nicholls and Joelle Mitchell.)

This week was a special one for LUMEDX and many of our users. Converging in San Francisco's Hotel Nikko in the days before NCDR.13 and ACC.13, users of LUMEDX software arrived from all over the United States to network, learn about new updates to the product suite and get some additional training. 

It was also a chance for those of us at LUMEDX to spend some time connecting and reconnecting with our end users in person. Many of our clients may be familiar with Senior Product Education Trainer John Nicholls, Clinical Registries Manager Katrina Craig and Senior Marketing & Events Coordinator Joelle Mitchell (who organizes this event and is omnipresent during ACC week!). Users also heard from Senior Director of Client Relations/Inside and Vertical Sales Gwen Korney, Nicole Blalock of John Muir Health, Vice President of Client Satisfaction Bill Gazda and Practice Director of Analytics Consulting Gus Gilbertson. 

We hope our attendees found this year’s conference educational and enjoyable. See you all again next year.

Vast Majority of Surveyed Hospitals Experience Breaches 

(Photo credit: Credit: Flickr/Mr. Cacahuate)

Ninety-four percent of hospitals responding to a recent survey experienced a data breach in the past two years, according to the Ponemon Institute. Forty-five percent of these hospitals indicated that their data was breached more than five times – an increase from 2010 when the percentage of respondents indicating more than five breaches was 29 percent.

With the potential for penalties under HIPAA, the cost of notifying stakeholders and civil suite awards, the possibility these hospitals could be stuck with millions in costs due to data breaches is staggering.

Even more discouraging, those hospitals that had not joined a health information exchange (HIE) cite low or lack of confidence in data security as the number one reason they were reluctant to share information within organizations.

As the move to electronic health records (EHR) continues, what measures is your organization taking to ensure patient data security?

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